Top `
milwaukee-road-logo.jpg

People of the Road: honoring the railroad workers who carried Milwaukee’s name across the country on rails

Railroads are regularly immortalized by depictions of trains and rails. It is time that we paid tribute to the individuals who gave the Milwaukee Railroad life.

Local artist Richard Taylor has been commissioned to construct an ambitious five-sculpture monument to honor and celebrate the thousands of workers who built the locomotives and rail cars made in Milwaukee. The long history of the Milwaukee Road railroad shops spans from 1848 to 1985. People of the Road will be a powerful reminder of the role the Milwaukee Road and their employees played in the history of Milwaukee and beyond.

Five permanent sculptures will create a new landmark and link the landscape to history. These towering steel structures will pay tribute to the people of the Road using silhouettes from archived photographs.

Two of the sculptures were installed at the Inaugural Melissa Cook Spring Ride on May 4, 2019. Please  contribute  to make the final three sculptures a reality.

Two of the sculptures were installed at the Inaugural Melissa Cook Spring Ride on May 4, 2019. Please contribute to make the final three sculptures a reality.

 

GOAL - DOUBLE your gift in May!

All donations up to $6,350 will be doubled thanks to matching grant by the Friends of Hank Aaron State Trail in honor of Melissa Cook, the only trail manager the Hank Aaron State Trail has known in the last 20 years. Melissa has stewarded the Trail, grown its programming, and invested unlimited energy in its capacity to serve our community.

2010+Run+Walk+-+Melissa.jpg
People of the Road Progress.JPG

The Friends of Hank Aaron State Trail are raising $250,000 to have the artwork installed in 2019. This project is more than half funded - your support will help make this tribute a reality.

GOAL: $250,000

  • Financial support raised to date: $102,554

  • In kind donations: $29,000

Financial support needed to complete the project: $118,446

Your support will help realize this tribute to the People of the Road and create a historical monument at the location where the Milwaukee Road operated for more than 100 years.

Supporters who contribute $1,000 or more will be recognized on a donor plaque near the sculptures. Supporters may choose to have their donation honor a loved one. Families and friends may coordinate to raise $1,000 to honor someone who worked at the Milwaukee Road.

 

or Donate via check

Make out checks to:
Friends of Hank Aaron State Trail
PO Box 35
Milwaukee, WI 53201

 
 

INSPIRATION

Samples of Milwaukee Road photos served as a source of material for silhouettes in the model. All figures were drawn from Milwaukee Road photos.

Rendering of the "People of the Road" monument

Rendering of the "People of the Road" monument

Richard Taylor’s design celebrates the thousands of workers who assembled locomotives, boxcars, and passenger cars in the Milwaukee Road’s Menomonee Valley shops. Thousands more worked on the trains in many capacities, from engineers and conductors to chefs, hostesses, and station agents.

Milwaukee Road Archived Photos.JPG

Five sculptures, the tallest of which is fourteen feet in height, will create a historical monument in the Menomonee River Valley where the Milwaukee Road operated for more than 100 years from 1878 to 1985.

Monument Description.JPG

The People of the Road are unified not only in their work and respective attire, but by an overlaying pattern of tracks that speak to their common purpose. The figures are meant to be seen from all sides. They invite viewers to walk around them, to see the industrial backbones of steel that not only give them sculptural strength but serve as metaphors for the backbone they gave the local economy and their own lives.

The tallest of the sculptures, the brushed aluminum crossing sign on the right, will be illuminated at night with dozens of LED lights. These will fade on and off for hours after dark, each evening’s duration reflecting that day’s solar energy collection. The fire-fly like display will call attention to the piece at night, animating it in a poetic manner.

The solid supporting elements of the sculptures recall other pieces of history from the railroad. A track side water tower, grain elevator, roundhouse, crate, locomotive, and steam cylinders refer to the many pieces of infrastructure necessary to make the railroad function. The architecture of these elements lends backdrop and footing to the cast of workers, as they did in real life.

Raised relief details illustrating the Milwaukee Road’s logos, the Hiawatha icon, and the years of the railway help to remind the viewer of the rich history of the local rails.

Railroads are already immortalized by depictions of trains and rails, but the true honor due to the Milwaukee Road lies in paying tribute to the individuals who gave it life.

The monument will be located near the corner of West Canal Street and West Milwaukee Road where the Milwaukee Road Rail Shops' chimneys once stood. Now along the Hank Aaron State Trail, it is a highly visible area with hikers, joggers, cyclists, and between 6,000 to 7,700 cars passing by daily. Photo: Chris Maertz

The monument will be located near the corner of West Canal Street and West Milwaukee Road where the Milwaukee Road Rail Shops' chimneys once stood. Now along the Hank Aaron State Trail, it is a highly visible area with hikers, joggers, cyclists, and between 6,000 to 7,700 cars passing by daily. Photo: Chris Maertz

 

A promotional film produced for the Milwaukee Road (Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad) detailing railroad operations from day to day. Start at 11:25 to see the people of the Milwaukee Road shops in action.

 
 

History

The Rail Shops are an important part of Milwaukee's history. In the early 1900s, the railroad was the largest employer in Milwaukee employing 5,500 of its famously skilled and dedicated workers in the Menomonee Valley. Many of them lived and raised their families in the surrounding neighborhoods.

In 2010, the last vestiges of the Milwaukee Road Rail Shops, the chimneys, were demolished due to structural issues and concern for public safety. The chimneys had stood as a visual historical reminder of this history. A small amount of interpretive signage along the trail continues to tell the story, but a strong, engaging visual statement is missing.

 
Photo: Ha Nguyen

Photo: Ha Nguyen

 
Overhead view of the Milwaukee Road Shops property with the 35th Street viaduct running across the middle of the image. The former chimneys are on the west side of the viaduct. All structures relating to the Milwaukee Road are now gone. (Milwaukee Road was the commonly used name for the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific Railroad.)

Overhead view of the Milwaukee Road Shops property with the 35th Street viaduct running across the middle of the image. The former chimneys are on the west side of the viaduct. All structures relating to the Milwaukee Road are now gone. (Milwaukee Road was the commonly used name for the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific Railroad.)

Photo: Greg Mross

Photo: Greg Mross

 

about the artist

Richard Taylor is a native of Milwaukee, with commissioned work located around the country. He has worked with many organizations over the years to integrate his sculptural work into specific settings.

Learn more about Richard Taylor.

Richard Taylor and Dan Adams, FOHAST Board President, during a visit to Taylor’s studio.

Richard Taylor and Dan Adams, FOHAST Board President, during a visit to Taylor’s studio.

Support “people of the road”

Supporters who contribute $1,000 or more will be recognized on a donor plaque near the sculptures. Supporters may choose to have their donation honor a loved one.

Please note: Credit cards are processed through PayPal

Or mail checks to:
Friends of Hank Aaron State Trail
PO Box 35
Milwaukee, WI 53201


Contact us for more information

Melissa Dorn Richards
dornrichards@gmail.com

Melissa Cook
Trail Manager
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources
melissa.cook@wisconsin.gov
414-263-8559


generous funders include:

brico_logo2.gif
GMF.jpg

Mary L. Nohl Fund

mkeartsboard.jpg
FOHAST logo-blue.JPG
MV_BID_HORIZ-4C.jpg
Milwaukee Road Historical Association.png
LogoCutout.jpg
LandWorksLogo.jpg
Sigma Group.jpg
RACM.png
download.png
 
PE_VerticalLogo.jpg
 
 

gifts greater than $1,000

Cheri & Tom Briscoe

David & Diane Buck

Mick & Lisa Hatch in honor of Melissa Cook

Heil Family Foundation

Bruce & Diane Keyes in honor of Melissa Cook

John & Linda Mellowes

The Saints Andrew & Mark Charitable Gift Trust

Jan Serr & John Shannon

In Honor of Melissa Cook:

  • Dan Adams & Nora O'Connell Adams

  • Steve Brachman

  • William Bradley

  • Mike & Donna Brady

  • Eddee Daniel

  • Jerome Flogel

  • Mick & Lisa Hatch

  • Kristine Hinrichs & John Rodee

  • Bruce & Diane Keyes

  • Michelle Kramer

  • Rick Meyer

  • Laura Mueller

  • Bob Peschel

  • Mark Plichta

  • Karen Sands

  • Mirtha Sosa Pacheco

  • Judy Springer

  • Chris Steinkamp

  • Mary Timm

  • Corey Zetts

gifts up to $999

G. R. Affeldt
Cindy Angelos
Anonymous
Anonymous in memory of Art & Don
Kathleen Bruecker
Cargill Milwaukee
Melissa Cook
Melissa Dorn Richards
Jean Gajewski in memory of James Komberec
Hatch Family Charitable Fund at the Greater Milwaukee Foundation
Harvey Henkelmann
John S. Heywood
Steve Keiller

Peter Lee
Jill & Chris Maertz in memory of her grandfather who spent his life working for the railroad
Barry Mainwood
Mike Maschek
Richard Piehl
Mary & Jon Reddin
Erin Terbeek in honor of Rogene Borzyskowski for fostering my love of trains
Debra Timm
Carol Tumey
Ron and Kathy Verkuilen
Peter Zanghi
Ann Zientek in memory of James Komberec

 

share your stories

Over the years, we have heard many stories of people reminiscing about the Milwaukee Road and watching the trains from the 35th Street Viaduct. We want to capture your stories! Please share below and include your email or send us a note at fohast@gmail.com. Sharing your story will help raise the funds to make this project possible!

Comment Form is loading comments...

Art on the Trail

Public art invigorates public spaces and helps to engage the community. It draws people onto the Trail, creates a recognizable identity, and links the landscape to the history, architecture, and social fabric of Milwaukee.

Art can be used to tell our story, honor our history, or explain an environmental concept in a creative and engaging way. It can create a more inviting space, for what may seem to some, an unfamiliar space.

Over time, several pieces of artwork have been developed specifically for the Hank Aaron State Trail. Please enjoy photos of the existing artwork on this website, but better yet, see them in person. Read on to learn more about the Milwaukee Road Monument, a sculptural work in progress.